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First look at AncestryDNA

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Below at are notes for those who attended this session at the Society of Australian Genealogists by webinar on 12  October  2021, 7 December 2021, 29 January 2022 and 9 April 2022.  Others are welcome to use these notes for their personal research.  Please contact me at chrisw9953[at]gmail[dot]com for  other uses.  I'll strive to update the notes as there are further developments or my understanding of the area grows. "Setting the scene" You can read about the "4 types of DNA"  HERE. AncestryDNA is an autosomal DNA test (atDNA) and is often referred to as a "cousinship test". You can read about the atDNA inheritance path  HERE. You can read about the possibility of sharing atDNA with a "cousin" who has also tested at AncestryDNA  HERE.  You'll have a match with second cousins or closer relations in all cases at AncestryDNA but only 98% of times for third cousins. The more distant the relationship, the less likely you are to share atDNA wi

MODULE 4 Activity: Getting to know WATO

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In this activity, you're placing yourself (the target/tester) into a well known tree - your own well researched tree!  Chose one of your great-great-grandparent couples where you have a group of known AncestryDNA matches who have that couple as your MRCA. Build a WATO tree from the great-great-grandparent couple out to each of the matches where your shared DNA is less than 400cM and enter the cM you share with these matches. Use the "Suggest Hypothesis" function at WATO and delete any hypotheses that don't meet the "time and place" criteria. Which hypothesis are you? Is it the strongest hypothesis? Now include any matches where your shared DNA is between 400cM and 1500cM and enter the cM you share with these matches.  Use the "Regenerate Hypothesis" function at WATO and delete any hypotheses that don't meet the "time and place" criteria. Which hypothesis are you? Is it the strongest hypothesis? Be prepared to discuss what you've l

MODULE 4: " What are the odds?" (WATO) tool at DNA Painter

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First published 07 September 2020 This post contains the notes for those who attended the following sessions by webinar at the Society of Australian Genealogists- Building research trees at Ancestry on 26 September 2020, Module 3 - Starting to solve your DNA dilemmas Summer 2021 Program, Module 3 - Starting to solve your DNA dilemmas Autumn 2021 Program and Module 3 - Starting to solve your DNA dilemmas Summer 2022 Program. Others are welcome to use these notes for their personal research.  Please contact me at  chrisw9953[at]gmail[dot]com  for other uses. I'll strive to update the notes as there are further developments or my understanding of the area grows. Remember that WATO is useful to record the relationship between your DNA matches where they share common ancestors. Using WATO to examine hypotheses is a more advanced technique that will take time to understand. From reading, watching and looking at WATOs, these are a few things I keep in my mind as I develop WATOs. The fact

Module 4 Preparation: "What are the Odds?" (WATO) tool at DNA Painter

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These activities are designed to give you some familiarity with WATO prior to Module 4. To undertake these activities, you should register for a free  DNAPainter.com  membership if you don't already have one. Use WATO  not WATO Beta V2  for this case study.    Just do as much as you can. If you have any questions, your can raise them in our discussion sessions, post them in our Facebook group or email them. Research question:  What is Gail's relationship to Chris, Deb, John and Rob? This is an example of a DNA dilemma from my family. You were introduced to the case study during the Module 3 presentations. In the Module 4 presentations, we’ll take some twists and turns with the case study to look at the WATO tool. What we know: Gail is a shared match with Chris, Deb, John and Robert.   Deb, John and Rob are siblings. Chris is their first cousin. Deb, John and Rob's mother, Pat, is the sister of Frank, Chris's father. Frank and Pat are the children of Jim and Essie. Jim

MODULE 3: Purchasing NSW, VIC and QLD BDM transcripts

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Purpose  If you find a NSW birth, marriage or death record listed on Ancestry , you can purchase a transcript by a direct link to  Marilyn Rowan's NSW Transcription Service . I purchase transcripts this way as they cost less and you receive them quickly. The current price is $17.50 and I generally receive the transcript within three to five business days as the process is more automated.  There's one process for births and another for marriages and deaths. NSW birth registrations When your search for a NSW birth produces this result on Ancestry , you can purchase the record by selecting Order Record . The first time, you'll see this message which will take you to the portal for NSW Transcription Service. So the request for the transcript has been added to the cart. At this point, you can either choose to continue searching or checkout . Marriage and death transcriptions You need to search the Australia, Marriage Index or Australia, Death Index on Ancestry  to purchase an a

MODULE 3: Three ways to add a "hanging branch" to your Ancestry tree

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To get the best out of my family history research, including DNA, I have a deep and broad public tree at Ancestry . There are currently over 12,000 people in my tree and many are "hanging branches". My tree is named as a "DNA Research Tree". The tree overview reads- "A working tree full of branches and twigs used to research my family with as much evidence as possible. If you have any questions or issues with what I've recorded, please contact me through Ancestry or at email[at]gmail[dot]com. Happy researching!" Many people choose to make their Ancestry trees private, searchable or unsearchable. While experienced researches know how to navigate through private, searchable trees, remember that most of your "DNA cousins" are inexperienced. Some researchers choose to have a public tree containing just their ancestral pedigree back to great-great-grandparents. Whichever way you go, ensure that the AncestryDNA tests you manage are attached to a s

MODULE 3: Building research trees at Ancestry

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This post contains the notes for those who attended the following sessions by webinar at the Society of Australian Genealogists- Building research trees at Ancestry on 26 September 2020, Module 3 - Starting to solve your DNA dilemmas Summer 2021 Program, Module 3 - Starting to solve your DNA dilemmas Autumn 2021 Program and Module 3 - Starting to solve your DNA dilemmas Summer 2022 Program. Others are welcome to use these notes for their personal research.  Please contact me at  chrisw9953[at]gmail[dot]com  for other uses. I'll strive to update the notes as there are further developments or my understanding of the area grows. In the following table, you'll see when I use private, unsearchable (Quick & Dirty) trees at Ancestry and when I do the research as a  "floating branch"   in the tree attached to my AncestryDNA test.   You can hear Blaine Bettinger speak about developing "Quick and Dirty trees"  HERE. The key to researching your DNA matches is findi